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Brandon Morris Belford

From the private sector to the White House, Brandon Belford transformed his talents in business and entrepreneurship for an accomplished career in public service. Reflecting on his college and work experience, Brandon gives valuable insights to students navigating through coursework and potential career paths today.

Profile

Brandon Belford’s accomplished path in public service was not what he initially imagined for himself, but he is glad that he kept an open-mind and remained flexible when developing his career. After attending the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Kenan-Flagler Business School, where he received a BS in Business Administration, he spent four years working in the private sector at Bank of America Securities as an analyst and associate. He realized that he wanted to broaden his skill set and decided to get his MBA at the Wharton School. While working toward his MBA, he concentrated on Finance and Entrepreneurial Management, however, he did take the time to explore everything Penn had to offer, including the social impact club, various global consulting and immersion programs, and taking a public policy course taught by then Wharton Professor, and former member of the White House Council of Economic Advisors, Betsey Stevenson. These experiences and his family’s commitment to public service is what ultimately sparked his interest in public policy work.

After graduating from Wharton, an exciting opportunity arose to work for a solar energy start-up, SunEdison, which was based in Washington, DC. At SunEdison, Brandon applied his finance and entrepreneurial skills to lead a number of business development and public affairs efforts to evaluate regulatory regimes and new market opportunities as well as to develop financing structures for solar energy systems. From this experience he was offered a position to join the Obama Administration as a Finance Specialist at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). During his time at the DOE, Brandon was part of the team responsible for implementing the American Recovery & Reinvestment Act of 2009; specifically the $11.3 billion allocated to states and local government for energy efficiency improvements, renewable energy generation, and clean energy manufacturing programs. It was in this position that Brandon realized the importance of the intersection between business and public policy, and was reminded of the diverse experiences and classes he took back at Wharton.

In 2011, with the help of a former classmate from Wharton, he was presented with the opportunity to work as a Senior Policy Advisor at the National Economic Council (NEC) at the White House. He knew that this was not only a historic opportunity to serve President Obama, but also a way for him to channel his business knowledge and public policy tools to help address the needs of underrepresented and underserved communities. Being from Flint, Michigan, he especially enjoyed being part of the White House team leading the Federal government’s work in partnering with the private sector and philanthropic community to help Detroit recover from its financial crisis in 2013. This project supported the city’s economic revitalization by helping to redevelop blighted properties, improve public safety, expand public transportation networks, and modernize municipal services, and he is proud to see that his hard work and dedication is positively impacting the people of his home state.

Brandon initially planned to stay in the White House for only six months, but ended up staying for more than three years. During his time he quickly developed a large, interdisciplinary portfolio of economic policy issues, including infrastructure, immigration, and tourism, which enabled him to be on the frontlines of numerous public policy debates and Presidential initiatives. These experiences also led to him being asked to become the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Aviation and International Affairs at the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). At the DOT he applies his managerial expertise to co-lead a 75 person team that is responsible for negotiating international aviation agreements, helping American transportation companies resolve doing business issues abroad, establishing transportation and mobility-related initiatives and partnerships with foreign governments, monitoring the financial fitness of the U.S. aviation industry, and administering a $250 million program to provide air service to small and rural communities throughout the United States. He enjoys the work he is currently doing at the DOT because it has allowed him to explore his interest in foreign policy and international affairs and continually build his expertise in policy areas and issues that affect the global economy and quality of life for people in communities around the world.

Even though Brandon did not initially think he would have a career in the public sector, he is glad that he kept his career options open. His advice to students would be to “chart your own path, because there is no predetermined route to [finding a specific career] and be sure to find ways to differentiate yourself. Also, keep short term and long term goals for yourself so you can continuously reassess where you are and where you want to go.” Given some of the frustrations and sacrifices inherent with public service, he feels that students who are interested in public policy should remind themselves why they want to be doing what they are doing. “It is important to ‘remind yourself why’ or always remember the deeper reason that made you want to embark upon a career in public service in the first place.” For those students who are already interested in pursuing a career in public policy, Brandon has just one piece of advice: “Try to develop an understanding and point of view on how technology and innovation will continue to affect regulated industries and how public policy will [need to] evolve […in order to respond] to the technology-enabled business models that are [already] changing the way transportation, energy, education, healthcare, food, and other regulated companies operate and interact with the public citizenry.” Lastly, he encourages all students to be flexible and entrepreneurial when developing a career to ensure that they do not miss out on opportunities that they may not have even known existed, and can be passionate about and happy with the career they ultimately end up with later in life.

Academic Information:

  • WG’08
  • University of Pennsylvania - The Wharton School
    • Master of Business Administration
    • Finance & Entrepreneurial Management
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill – Kenan-Flagler Business School – 2002
    • Bachelors of Science
    • Major: Business Administration

WHARTON PPI
RESOURCE SPOTLIGHT:

  • <h3>Congressional Budget Office</h3><p><img width="180" height="180" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/180/height/180/380_cbo-logo.rev.1406822035.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image380 lw_align_right" data-max-w="180" data-max-h="180"/>Since its founding in 1974, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) has produced independent analyses of budgetary and economic issues to support the Congressional budget process.</p><p> The agency is strictly nonpartisan and conducts objective, impartial analysis, which is evident in each of the dozens of reports and hundreds of cost estimates that its economists and policy analysts produce each year. CBO does not make policy recommendations, and each report and cost estimate discloses the agency’s assumptions and methodologies. <strong>CBO provides budgetary and economic information in a variety of ways and at various points in the legislative process.</strong> Products include baseline budget projections and economic forecasts, analysis of the President’s budget, cost estimates, analysis of federal mandates, working papers, and more.</p><p> Quick link to Products page: <a href="http://www.cbo.gov/about/our-products" target="_blank">http://www.cbo.gov/about/our-products</a></p><p> Quick link to Topics: <a href="http://www.cbo.gov/topics" target="_blank">http://www.cbo.gov/topics</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>MapStats</h3><p> A feature of FedStats, MapStats allows users to search for <strong>state, county, city, congressional district, or Federal judicial district data</strong> (demographic, economic, and geographic).</p><p> Quick link: <a href="http://www.fedstats.gov/mapstats/" target="_blank">http://www.fedstats.gov/mapstats/</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>National Bureau of Economic Research (Public Use Data Archive)</h3><p><img width="180" height="43" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/180/height/43/478_nber.rev.1407530465.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image478 lw_align_right" data-max-w="329" data-max-h="79"/>Founded in 1920, the <strong>National Bureau of Economic Research</strong> is a private, nonprofit, nonpartisan research organization dedicated to promoting a greater understanding of how the economy works. The NBER is committed to undertaking and disseminating unbiased economic research among public policymakers, business professionals, and the academic community.</p><p> Quick Link to <strong>Public Use Data Archive</strong>: <a href="http://www.nber.org/data/" target="_blank">http://www.nber.org/data/</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>Federal Aviation Administration: Accident & Incident Data</h3><p><img width="100" height="100" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/100/height/100/80_faa-logo.rev.1402681347.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image80 lw_align_left" srcset="/live/image/scale/2x/gid/4/width/100/height/100/80_faa-logo.rev.1402681347.jpg 2x, /live/image/scale/3x/gid/4/width/100/height/100/80_faa-logo.rev.1402681347.jpg 3x" data-max-w="550" data-max-h="550"/>The NTSB issues an accident report following each investigation. These reports are available online for reports issued since 1996, with older reports coming online soon. The reports listing is sortable by the event date, report date, city, and state.</p><p> Quick link: <a href="http://www.faa.gov/data_research/accident_incident/" target="_blank">http://www.faa.gov/data_research/accident_incident/</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>The World Bank Data (U.S.)</h3><p><img width="130" height="118" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/130/height/118/484_world-bank-logo.rev.1407788945.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image484 lw_align_left" srcset="/live/image/scale/2x/gid/4/width/130/height/118/484_world-bank-logo.rev.1407788945.jpg 2x, /live/image/scale/3x/gid/4/width/130/height/118/484_world-bank-logo.rev.1407788945.jpg 3x" data-max-w="1406" data-max-h="1275"/>The <strong>World Bank</strong> provides World Development Indicators, Surveys, and data on Finances and Climate Change.</p><p> Quick link: <a href="http://data.worldbank.org/country/united-states" target="_blank">http://data.worldbank.org/country/united-states</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>NOAA National Climatic Data Center</h3><p><img width="200" height="198" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/200/height/198/483_noaa_logo.rev.1407788692.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image483 lw_align_left" srcset="/live/image/scale/2x/gid/4/width/200/height/198/483_noaa_logo.rev.1407788692.jpg 2x, /live/image/scale/3x/gid/4/width/200/height/198/483_noaa_logo.rev.1407788692.jpg 3x" data-max-w="954" data-max-h="945"/>NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) is responsible for preserving, monitoring, assessing, and providing public access to the Nation’s treasure of <strong>climate and historical weather data and information</strong>.</p><p> Quick link to home page: <a href="http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/" target="_blank">http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/</a></p><p> Quick link to NCDC’s climate and weather datasets, products, and various web pages and resources: <a href="http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/data-access/quick-links" target="_blank">http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/data-access/quick-links</a></p><p> Quick link to Text & Map Search: <a href="http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/cdo-web/" target="_blank">http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/cdo-web/</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>HUD State of the Cities Data Systems</h3><p><strong><img width="200" height="200" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/200/height/200/482_hud_logo.rev.1407788472.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image482 lw_align_left" srcset="/live/image/scale/2x/gid/4/width/200/height/200/482_hud_logo.rev.1407788472.jpg 2x, /live/image/scale/3x/gid/4/width/200/height/200/482_hud_logo.rev.1407788472.jpg 3x" data-max-w="612" data-max-h="613"/>The SOCDS provides data for individual Metropolitan Areas, Central Cities, and Suburbs.</strong> It is a portal for non-national data made available through a number of outside institutions (e.g. Census, BLS, FBI and others).</p><p> Quick link: <a href="http://www.huduser.org/portal/datasets/socds.html" target="_blank">http://www.huduser.org/portal/datasets/socds.html</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>Federal Reserve Economic Data (FRED®)</h3><p><strong><img width="180" height="79" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/180/height/79/481_fred-logo.rev.1407788243.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image481 lw_align_right" data-max-w="222" data-max-h="97"/>An online database consisting of more than 72,000 economic data time series from 54 national, international, public, and private sources.</strong> FRED®, created and maintained by Research Department at the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, goes far beyond simply providing data: It combines data with a powerful mix of tools that help the user understand, interact with, display, and disseminate the data.</p><p> Quick link to data page: <a href="http://research.stlouisfed.org/fred2/tags/series" target="_blank">http://research.stlouisfed.org/fred2/tags/series</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>The Penn World Table</h3><p> The Penn World Table provides purchasing power parity and national income accounts converted to international prices for 189 countries/territories for some or all of the years 1950-2010.</p><p><a href="https://pwt.sas.upenn.edu/php_site/pwt71/pwt71_form.php" target="_blank">Quick link.</a> </p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>National Center for Education Statistics</h3><p><strong><img width="400" height="80" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/400/height/80/479_nces.rev.1407787656.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image479 lw_align_right" data-max-w="400" data-max-h="80"/>The National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) is the primary federal entity for collecting and analyzing data related to education in the U.S. and other nations.</strong> NCES is located within the U.S. Department of Education and the Institute of Education Sciences. NCES has an extensive Statistical Standards Program that consults and advises on methodological and statistical aspects involved in the design, collection, and analysis of data collections in the Center. To learn more about the NCES, <a href="http://nces.ed.gov/about/" target="_blank">click here</a>.</p><p> Quick link to NCES Data Tools: <a href="http://nces.ed.gov/datatools/index.asp?DataToolSectionID=4" target="_blank">http://nces.ed.gov/datatools/index.asp?DataToolSectionID=4</a></p><p> Quick link to Quick Tables and Figures: <a href="http://nces.ed.gov/quicktables/" target="_blank">http://nces.ed.gov/quicktables/</a></p><p> Quick link to NCES Fast Facts (Note: The primary purpose of the Fast Facts website is to provide users with concise information on a range of educational issues, from early childhood to adult learning.): <a href="http://nces.ed.gov/fastfacts/" target="_blank">http://nces.ed.gov/fastfacts/#</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>USDA Nutrition Assistance Data</h3><p><img width="180" height="124" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/180/height/124/485_usda_logo.rev.1407789238.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image485 lw_align_right" srcset="/live/image/scale/2x/gid/4/width/180/height/124/485_usda_logo.rev.1407789238.jpg 2x, /live/image/scale/3x/gid/4/width/180/height/124/485_usda_logo.rev.1407789238.jpg 3x" data-max-w="1233" data-max-h="850"/>Data and research regarding the following <strong>USDA Nutrition Assistance</strong> programs are available through this site:</p><ul><li>Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) </li><li>Food Distribution Programs </li><li>School Meals </li><li>Women, Infants and Children </li></ul><p> Quick link: <a href="http://www.fns.usda.gov/data-and-statistics" target="_blank">http://www.fns.usda.gov/data-and-statistics</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>Internal Revenue Service: Tax Statistics</h3><p><img width="155" height="200" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/155/height/200/486_irs_logo.rev.1407789424.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image486 lw_align_left" srcset="/live/image/scale/2x/gid/4/width/155/height/200/486_irs_logo.rev.1407789424.jpg 2x" data-max-w="463" data-max-h="596"/>Find statistics on business tax, individual tax, charitable and exempt organizations, IRS operations and budget, and income (SOI), as well as statistics by form, products, publications, papers, and other IRS data.</p><p> Quick link to <strong>Tax Statistics, where you will find a wide range of tables, articles, and data</strong> that describe and measure elements of the U.S. tax system: <a href="http://www.irs.gov/uac/Tax-Stats-2" target="_blank">http://www.irs.gov/uac/Tax-Stats-2</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>