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The Case for More Skilled Immigration

October 29, 2015

Since President Obama’s 2012 election, little in the way of important economic legislation has been passed. Republicans have stubbornly refused to raise taxes while Democrats have drawn a ring around entitlement programs like Social Security. Congressional Republicans have wasted the last several years fruitlessly trying to repeal the Affordable Care Act, and Democrats have taken a turn to the left recently in their efforts to undermine the Trans Pacific Partnership. The 113th Congress (2013-2015) was one of the least productive ever, and the 114th appears (2015-2017) that it will follow the same path. Skilled immigration reform, at least in theory, represents the rare possibility to break the impasse between liberals and conservatives. 

By Aaron Jordan, Penn Law ’16

Business-friendly Republicans want companies to have access to the best possible employees, while Democrats have long been proud proponents of a more diverse and multicultural society.

Yet both parties have nativist streaks that appear to be growing stronger. Senator Jeff Sessions (R-AL), the Chairman of the Subcommittee on Immigration and the National Interest, has repeatedly stated that he thinks the shortage of tech workers is a “hoax”(1). Meanwhile, organized labor, which has shown renewed muscle in the trade debate, would attempt to convince liberals to oppose skilled immigration reform. Other Democrats may hold out on high skilled immigration reform because they want such changes to be coupled with help for the country‘s poor undocumented workers.

The continuing failure to pass high skilled immigration reform represents a prime example of Washington incompetence. Broadening visa programs for skilled immigrants would generate economic growth, foment business creation, and strengthen American geopolitical interests.

The economic benefits of increased skilled immigration are both vast and apparent.  Economists are virtually unanimous on the subject: a poll of elite economists by the University of Chicago Booth School, found that 49% strongly agreed and another 46% agreed that the “average US citizen would be better off if a larger number of highly educated foreign workers were legally allowed to immigrate to the US each year.” The other 5% were uncertain; not a single top economist disagreed with the statement (2).

The reasons for this virtual unanimity are myriad. High-skilled immigrants tend to have moderate to high incomes, meaning they spend money on various good and services in America. Immigrants are significantly more likely to start a business (3); South-African born serial entrepreneur and Penn graduate Elon Musk has already started Pay Pal, Space X, and Tesla. E-Bay was founded by a French-born son of Iranian immigrants, Google was co-founded by a Russian, and Yahoo was co-started by a Taiwanese immigrant. Foreign born actors have headlined Hollywood films for years: Christian Bale (England), Liam Neeson (Ireland), Penelope Cruz (Spain), and Charlize Theron (South Africa) are just a few members in the long-line of immigrant movie stars. Daniel Day-Lewis, who recently won his third Oscar for playing none other than Abraham Lincoln, is English-Irish. And celebrities do actually have visa problems: Daniel Radcliffe was stopped at the Canadian border, and several Latin popstars have had to cancel American tours.

Opponents of high-skilled immigration tend to view the number of jobs in an economy as set in stone. Their simple logic goes as follows: for every job an immigrant takes, that is one less position for an American. Yet this zero-sum fallacy completely forgets to account for the entrepreneurial tendencies of immigrants, which result in an untold number of jobs for Americans. Nor does the zero-sum argumentation account for spillover effects: the more immigrants that there are in the U.S, the more money that is spent on American food, clothing, cars, etc. Finally, there is a clear efficiency rationale for hiring the best person possible, regardless of nationality: it’s better to have Australian star Russell Crowe play Maximus in Gladiator than a B-list American actor, and few people would pick a mediocre American doctor over a superstar immigrant one if they were about to undergo open heart surgery.

High-skilled immigrants are also good for the social safety net. They pay substantial taxes, yet are not allowed to collect benefits for a number of years. Moreover, as the median age in America continues to rise and birth rates per adult continue to stall, immigrants can provide the necessary tax revenues to sustain entitlement programs like Social Security and Medicare.

There are also geopolitical reasons for expanding skilled immigration. As China continues to grow, America will find it increasingly difficult to stay ahead economically and militarily. A wave of talented immigrants would help America maintain its lead. Moreover, Sino-American relations would be better served if future Chinese leaders have studied or worked in the U.S. Current Chinese leaders tend to believe the worst about Americans, but the future generation is likely to have softer views because many have attended college, graduate school, or worked in the states. This is because countries that have a high percentage of immigrants tend to the assess the U.S. favorably; for instance, America maintained a fairly objectionable foreign policy in countries like Guatemala and El Salvador (overthrowing a democratically elected government in the former and support military dictatorships in both), yet the U.S. is viewed quite highly in both countries because many Salvadorans and Guatemalans have friends or family that have thrived in the United States (4).

Senator Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) has put forth a bill, The Immigration Innovation Act, which would almost triple the number of slots available under the H-1B visa program for skilled workers (5). While it does not go far enough, and unfortunately does nothing to help the 11 million undocumented immigrants currently in the U.S., the Immigration Innovation Act would undoubtedly be a step in the right direction. The bill would lead to more jobs, faster economic growth, speed up innovation, sure up the social safety net, and would promote American interests abroad. If the Immigration Innovation Act is to fail, it would not be a referendum on high skilled immigration, but rather would serve as a sorry reflection of our broken politics.

  1. Anti-H-1B senator to head immigration panel

  2. High-Skilled Immigrants
  3. Give Us Your Geniuses: Why Seeking Smart Immigrants Is a No-Brainer
  4. Chapter 4: Global Publics View the United States
  5. SEN. HATCH INTRODUCES S. 153 TO INCREASE H-1B VISAS
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  • <h3>MapStats</h3><p> A feature of FedStats, MapStats allows users to search for <strong>state, county, city, congressional district, or Federal judicial district data</strong> (demographic, economic, and geographic).</p><p> Quick link: <a href="http://www.fedstats.gov/mapstats/" target="_blank">http://www.fedstats.gov/mapstats/</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>Congressional Budget Office</h3><p><img width="180" height="180" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/180/height/180/380_cbo-logo.rev.1406822035.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image380 lw_align_right" data-max-w="180" data-max-h="180"/>Since its founding in 1974, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) has produced independent analyses of budgetary and economic issues to support the Congressional budget process.</p><p> The agency is strictly nonpartisan and conducts objective, impartial analysis, which is evident in each of the dozens of reports and hundreds of cost estimates that its economists and policy analysts produce each year. CBO does not make policy recommendations, and each report and cost estimate discloses the agency’s assumptions and methodologies. <strong>CBO provides budgetary and economic information in a variety of ways and at various points in the legislative process.</strong> Products include baseline budget projections and economic forecasts, analysis of the President’s budget, cost estimates, analysis of federal mandates, working papers, and more.</p><p> Quick link to Products page: <a href="http://www.cbo.gov/about/our-products" target="_blank">http://www.cbo.gov/about/our-products</a></p><p> Quick link to Topics: <a href="http://www.cbo.gov/topics" target="_blank">http://www.cbo.gov/topics</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>Federal Aviation Administration: Accident & Incident Data</h3><p><img width="100" height="100" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/100/height/100/80_faa-logo.rev.1402681347.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image80 lw_align_left" srcset="/live/image/scale/2x/gid/4/width/100/height/100/80_faa-logo.rev.1402681347.jpg 2x, /live/image/scale/3x/gid/4/width/100/height/100/80_faa-logo.rev.1402681347.jpg 3x" data-max-w="550" data-max-h="550"/>The NTSB issues an accident report following each investigation. These reports are available online for reports issued since 1996, with older reports coming online soon. The reports listing is sortable by the event date, report date, city, and state.</p><p> Quick link: <a href="http://www.faa.gov/data_research/accident_incident/" target="_blank">http://www.faa.gov/data_research/accident_incident/</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>NOAA National Climatic Data Center</h3><p><img width="200" height="198" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/200/height/198/483_noaa_logo.rev.1407788692.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image483 lw_align_left" srcset="/live/image/scale/2x/gid/4/width/200/height/198/483_noaa_logo.rev.1407788692.jpg 2x, /live/image/scale/3x/gid/4/width/200/height/198/483_noaa_logo.rev.1407788692.jpg 3x" data-max-w="954" data-max-h="945"/>NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) is responsible for preserving, monitoring, assessing, and providing public access to the Nation’s treasure of <strong>climate and historical weather data and information</strong>.</p><p> Quick link to home page: <a href="http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/" target="_blank">http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/</a></p><p> Quick link to NCDC’s climate and weather datasets, products, and various web pages and resources: <a href="http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/data-access/quick-links" target="_blank">http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/data-access/quick-links</a></p><p> Quick link to Text & Map Search: <a href="http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/cdo-web/" target="_blank">http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/cdo-web/</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>Internal Revenue Service: Tax Statistics</h3><p><img width="155" height="200" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/155/height/200/486_irs_logo.rev.1407789424.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image486 lw_align_left" srcset="/live/image/scale/2x/gid/4/width/155/height/200/486_irs_logo.rev.1407789424.jpg 2x" data-max-w="463" data-max-h="596"/>Find statistics on business tax, individual tax, charitable and exempt organizations, IRS operations and budget, and income (SOI), as well as statistics by form, products, publications, papers, and other IRS data.</p><p> Quick link to <strong>Tax Statistics, where you will find a wide range of tables, articles, and data</strong> that describe and measure elements of the U.S. tax system: <a href="http://www.irs.gov/uac/Tax-Stats-2" target="_blank">http://www.irs.gov/uac/Tax-Stats-2</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>The World Bank Data (U.S.)</h3><p><img width="130" height="118" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/130/height/118/484_world-bank-logo.rev.1407788945.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image484 lw_align_left" srcset="/live/image/scale/2x/gid/4/width/130/height/118/484_world-bank-logo.rev.1407788945.jpg 2x, /live/image/scale/3x/gid/4/width/130/height/118/484_world-bank-logo.rev.1407788945.jpg 3x" data-max-w="1406" data-max-h="1275"/>The <strong>World Bank</strong> provides World Development Indicators, Surveys, and data on Finances and Climate Change.</p><p> Quick link: <a href="http://data.worldbank.org/country/united-states" target="_blank">http://data.worldbank.org/country/united-states</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>USDA Nutrition Assistance Data</h3><p><img width="180" height="124" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/180/height/124/485_usda_logo.rev.1407789238.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image485 lw_align_right" srcset="/live/image/scale/2x/gid/4/width/180/height/124/485_usda_logo.rev.1407789238.jpg 2x, /live/image/scale/3x/gid/4/width/180/height/124/485_usda_logo.rev.1407789238.jpg 3x" data-max-w="1233" data-max-h="850"/>Data and research regarding the following <strong>USDA Nutrition Assistance</strong> programs are available through this site:</p><ul><li>Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) </li><li>Food Distribution Programs </li><li>School Meals </li><li>Women, Infants and Children </li></ul><p> Quick link: <a href="http://www.fns.usda.gov/data-and-statistics" target="_blank">http://www.fns.usda.gov/data-and-statistics</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>National Center for Education Statistics</h3><p><strong><img width="400" height="80" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/400/height/80/479_nces.rev.1407787656.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image479 lw_align_right" data-max-w="400" data-max-h="80"/>The National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) is the primary federal entity for collecting and analyzing data related to education in the U.S. and other nations.</strong> NCES is located within the U.S. Department of Education and the Institute of Education Sciences. NCES has an extensive Statistical Standards Program that consults and advises on methodological and statistical aspects involved in the design, collection, and analysis of data collections in the Center. To learn more about the NCES, <a href="http://nces.ed.gov/about/" target="_blank">click here</a>.</p><p> Quick link to NCES Data Tools: <a href="http://nces.ed.gov/datatools/index.asp?DataToolSectionID=4" target="_blank">http://nces.ed.gov/datatools/index.asp?DataToolSectionID=4</a></p><p> Quick link to Quick Tables and Figures: <a href="http://nces.ed.gov/quicktables/" target="_blank">http://nces.ed.gov/quicktables/</a></p><p> Quick link to NCES Fast Facts (Note: The primary purpose of the Fast Facts website is to provide users with concise information on a range of educational issues, from early childhood to adult learning.): <a href="http://nces.ed.gov/fastfacts/" target="_blank">http://nces.ed.gov/fastfacts/#</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>National Bureau of Economic Research (Public Use Data Archive)</h3><p><img width="180" height="43" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/180/height/43/478_nber.rev.1407530465.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image478 lw_align_right" data-max-w="329" data-max-h="79"/>Founded in 1920, the <strong>National Bureau of Economic Research</strong> is a private, nonprofit, nonpartisan research organization dedicated to promoting a greater understanding of how the economy works. The NBER is committed to undertaking and disseminating unbiased economic research among public policymakers, business professionals, and the academic community.</p><p> Quick Link to <strong>Public Use Data Archive</strong>: <a href="http://www.nber.org/data/" target="_blank">http://www.nber.org/data/</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>Federal Reserve Economic Data (FRED®)</h3><p><strong><img width="180" height="79" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/180/height/79/481_fred-logo.rev.1407788243.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image481 lw_align_right" data-max-w="222" data-max-h="97"/>An online database consisting of more than 72,000 economic data time series from 54 national, international, public, and private sources.</strong> FRED®, created and maintained by Research Department at the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, goes far beyond simply providing data: It combines data with a powerful mix of tools that help the user understand, interact with, display, and disseminate the data.</p><p> Quick link to data page: <a href="http://research.stlouisfed.org/fred2/tags/series" target="_blank">http://research.stlouisfed.org/fred2/tags/series</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>The Penn World Table</h3><p> The Penn World Table provides purchasing power parity and national income accounts converted to international prices for 189 countries/territories for some or all of the years 1950-2010.</p><p><a href="https://pwt.sas.upenn.edu/php_site/pwt71/pwt71_form.php" target="_blank">Quick link.</a> </p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>HUD State of the Cities Data Systems</h3><p><strong><img width="200" height="200" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/200/height/200/482_hud_logo.rev.1407788472.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image482 lw_align_left" srcset="/live/image/scale/2x/gid/4/width/200/height/200/482_hud_logo.rev.1407788472.jpg 2x, /live/image/scale/3x/gid/4/width/200/height/200/482_hud_logo.rev.1407788472.jpg 3x" data-max-w="612" data-max-h="613"/>The SOCDS provides data for individual Metropolitan Areas, Central Cities, and Suburbs.</strong> It is a portal for non-national data made available through a number of outside institutions (e.g. Census, BLS, FBI and others).</p><p> Quick link: <a href="http://www.huduser.org/portal/datasets/socds.html" target="_blank">http://www.huduser.org/portal/datasets/socds.html</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>