• <div class="header-image" style="background-image: url(/live/image/gid/4/2611_Header_V6N2_web_4.rev.1518551584.jpg);">​</div><div class="header-background-color"/>

Audit the Fed

August 10, 2017
President Trump’s stunning election victory last November breathed new life into the “Audit the Fed” movement. He promised supporters along the campaign trail to increase transparency over monetary policy decisions made by the Federal Reserve.

“Audit the Fed,” formally known as the Federal Reserve Transparency Act, was conceived in 2009 by U.S. Representative Ron Paul (R., TX) in the wake of the Great Recession. It experienced some bipartisan support, and multiple editions over the years passed through the House before being defeated by the Senate under the term of President Obama, a vocal opponent of the movement. Under Republican control of both legislative bodies in addition to the presidency, Representative Thomas Massie (R., KY) and Senator Rand Paul (R., KY) reintroduced them in early January of 2017. [4]

Current State of Federal Reserve

Congress established the Federal Reserve in 1913 “to provide the nation with a safer, more flexible, and more stable monetary and financial system.” [5] It was created to operate independently of the government to ensure that its actions remained free of political influences, which experts suggest would be critical of monetary policy decisions. [3] The Federal Reserve system consists of twelve regional Reserve Banks overseen by the Board of Governors. The Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC), which decides the direction of the nation’s monetary policy, consists of the seven members of the Board of Governors as well as five of the twelve Reserve Bank presidents. [5] Four of those presidents, with the exception of the president of the Federal Reserve of New York, rotate their voting rights among all the other presidents.

Image: Structure of the Federal Reserve. Source: Federal Reserve.Image: Structure of the Federal Reserve. Source: Federal Reserve.

Debate Behind the Bill

“Audit the Fed” seeks to significantly curtail the power of the FOMC by subjecting the discussions and decisions made at these meetings to review by the Government Accountability Office (GAO). Under the bill, the GAO would be able to put forth an assessment of the FOMC’s decisions to the public. Supporters of the Transparency Act argue the Federal Reserve has too much authority and has made questionable decisions without sufficient oversight. They point to the most recent financial crisis and show suspicion over the Fed’s accommodative monetary policy, in large part because of its decision to slash interest rates and bail out some of the largest financial firms. They also take aim at the Fed’s decision to accumulate a massive $4.5 trillion portfolio of securities. [2] Massie and others claim the bill would ensure that the Federal Reserve remains accountable and increases its transparency to the government and to the public. [5]

Image: Graphical depiction of Fed's rapidly increasing balance sheet, a trend that critics of the institution have used as a focal point of many arguments. Source: Market Watch.

Image: Graphical depiction of Fed's rapidly increasing balance sheet, a trend that critics of the institution have used as a focal point of many arguments. Source: Market Watch.

However, the opposition parties, consisting of most Democrats as well as many economists, argue the bill undermines the Federal Reserve’s independence by opening it up to governmental pressure. Former Chairman of the Federal Reserve Ben Bernanke sharply condemns the bill, stating it will prevent the Fed from making the best monetary policy decisions for the American economy. [1] He suggests that GAO analysis of the Fed’s decisions could lead to Congressional and even public backlash of the strategies used, particularly with the general unpopularity with monetary policy decision.

Problems with “Audit the Fed”

The name “Audit the Fed” is misleading in itself. The Federal Reserve already has its financial statements audited by the well-respected accounting firm, Deloitte & Touche, the results of which are published online. The minutes from every meeting of the FOMC are published as well, and the content of the Fed’s portfolio, including each individual security, is available to the public as well.

The Transparency Act shifts the audit from a private independent institution to the government-controlled GAO, repealing previous legislation that prevented such close governmental involvement. which would open it up to criticism from Congress. Bernanke cites sources in claiming that “Congress is not well-suited to make monetary policy decisions itself,” as it is inclined to focus on short-term economic benefit even at the cost of long-term growth. [1]

The Fed by no means deserves free reign, and it must be held accountable to the government and the people it serves. The argument that the government does not have enough control over the institution, however, falls short when understanding the incredible authority exercised by the executive. Each of the seven governors, including the chairman, is nominated by the president and is confirmed by Congress. Therefore, the president has the opportunity to shape the direction of monetary policy with his choices for appointments.

President Trump is in a particularly strong position to shape the course of monetary policy in the foreseeable future. There are currently three vacant seats on the Board of Governors, one likely to be filled by Trump’s recently announced nominee, investment-fund manager Randal Quarles. In 2018, Trump has the opportunity to replace Chairman Janet Yellen and Vice-Chairman Stanley Fischer, whose terms in their respective positions both expire. Even if they do decide to remain as Board members, as their terms last until 2024 and 2020, respectively, Trump would be able to change the two leading voices on monetary policy.

The Federal Reserve maintains its degree of independence from the government to preserve its ability to make the best decisions for the country. It is far from perfect, as history has shown, but the members of the Board of Governors and the FOMC are at the top of their field, and deserve the trust of Congress and the American people. Increasing transparency should continue to be a priority, but not at the cost of its independence; “Audit the Fed” is a step backwards, dangerously subjecting monetary policy to political influences.

Student Blog Disclaimer
  • The views expressed on the Student Blog are the author’s opinions and don’t necessarily represent the Penn Wharton Public Policy Initiative’s strategies, recommendations, or opinions.

References

  [1] Bernanke, Ben S. ““Audit the Fed” Is Not about Auditing the Fed.” Brookings. Brookings, 29 July 2016. Web. 15 July 2017.

  [2] Nicolaci Da Costa, Pedro. “4 Charts Shed Light on the Fed’s Mysterious $4.5 Trillion Portfolio.” Business Insider. Business Insider, 3 May 2017. Web. 31 July 2017.

  [3] Rivlin, Alice M. “Preserving the Independence of the Federal Reserve.” Brookings. Brookings, 02 Mar. 2017. Web. 18 July 2017.

  [4] Schroeder, Peter. “‘Audit the Fed’ Bill Gets New Push under Trump.” The Hill. Capitol Hill Publishing Corp, 04 Jan. 2017. Web. 14 July 2017.

  [5] “Structure of the Federal Reserve System.” Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, 3 Mar. 2017. Web. 17 July 2017.

PENN WHARTON PPI
RESOURCE SPOTLIGHT:

  • <h3>National Bureau of Economic Research (Public Use Data Archive)</h3><p><img width="180" height="43" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/180/height/43/478_nber.rev.1407530465.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image478 lw_align_right" data-max-w="329" data-max-h="79"/>Founded in 1920, the <strong>National Bureau of Economic Research</strong> is a private, nonprofit, nonpartisan research organization dedicated to promoting a greater understanding of how the economy works. The NBER is committed to undertaking and disseminating unbiased economic research among public policymakers, business professionals, and the academic community.</p><p> Quick Link to <strong>Public Use Data Archive</strong>: <a href="http://www.nber.org/data/" target="_blank">http://www.nber.org/data/</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>Congressional Budget Office</h3><p><img width="180" height="180" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/180/height/180/380_cbo-logo.rev.1406822035.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image380 lw_align_right" data-max-w="180" data-max-h="180"/>Since its founding in 1974, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) has produced independent analyses of budgetary and economic issues to support the Congressional budget process.</p><p> The agency is strictly nonpartisan and conducts objective, impartial analysis, which is evident in each of the dozens of reports and hundreds of cost estimates that its economists and policy analysts produce each year. CBO does not make policy recommendations, and each report and cost estimate discloses the agency’s assumptions and methodologies. <strong>CBO provides budgetary and economic information in a variety of ways and at various points in the legislative process.</strong> Products include baseline budget projections and economic forecasts, analysis of the President’s budget, cost estimates, analysis of federal mandates, working papers, and more.</p><p> Quick link to Products page: <a href="http://www.cbo.gov/about/our-products" target="_blank">http://www.cbo.gov/about/our-products</a></p><p> Quick link to Topics: <a href="http://www.cbo.gov/topics" target="_blank">http://www.cbo.gov/topics</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>The Penn World Table</h3><p> The Penn World Table provides purchasing power parity and national income accounts converted to international prices for 189 countries/territories for some or all of the years 1950-2010.</p><p><a href="https://pwt.sas.upenn.edu/php_site/pwt71/pwt71_form.php" target="_blank">Quick link.</a> </p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>Federal Reserve Economic Data (FRED®)</h3><p><strong><img width="180" height="79" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/180/height/79/481_fred-logo.rev.1407788243.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image481 lw_align_right" data-max-w="222" data-max-h="97"/>An online database consisting of more than 72,000 economic data time series from 54 national, international, public, and private sources.</strong> FRED®, created and maintained by Research Department at the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, goes far beyond simply providing data: It combines data with a powerful mix of tools that help the user understand, interact with, display, and disseminate the data.</p><p> Quick link to data page: <a href="http://research.stlouisfed.org/fred2/tags/series" target="_blank">http://research.stlouisfed.org/fred2/tags/series</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>HUD State of the Cities Data Systems</h3><p><strong><img width="200" height="200" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/200/height/200/482_hud_logo.rev.1407788472.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image482 lw_align_left" srcset="/live/image/scale/2x/gid/4/width/200/height/200/482_hud_logo.rev.1407788472.jpg 2x, /live/image/scale/3x/gid/4/width/200/height/200/482_hud_logo.rev.1407788472.jpg 3x" data-max-w="612" data-max-h="613"/>The SOCDS provides data for individual Metropolitan Areas, Central Cities, and Suburbs.</strong> It is a portal for non-national data made available through a number of outside institutions (e.g. Census, BLS, FBI and others).</p><p> Quick link: <a href="http://www.huduser.org/portal/datasets/socds.html" target="_blank">http://www.huduser.org/portal/datasets/socds.html</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>Federal Aviation Administration: Accident & Incident Data</h3><p><img width="100" height="100" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/100/height/100/80_faa-logo.rev.1402681347.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image80 lw_align_left" srcset="/live/image/scale/2x/gid/4/width/100/height/100/80_faa-logo.rev.1402681347.jpg 2x, /live/image/scale/3x/gid/4/width/100/height/100/80_faa-logo.rev.1402681347.jpg 3x" data-max-w="550" data-max-h="550"/>The NTSB issues an accident report following each investigation. These reports are available online for reports issued since 1996, with older reports coming online soon. The reports listing is sortable by the event date, report date, city, and state.</p><p> Quick link: <a href="http://www.faa.gov/data_research/accident_incident/" target="_blank">http://www.faa.gov/data_research/accident_incident/</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>NOAA National Climatic Data Center</h3><p><img width="200" height="198" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/200/height/198/483_noaa_logo.rev.1407788692.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image483 lw_align_left" srcset="/live/image/scale/2x/gid/4/width/200/height/198/483_noaa_logo.rev.1407788692.jpg 2x, /live/image/scale/3x/gid/4/width/200/height/198/483_noaa_logo.rev.1407788692.jpg 3x" data-max-w="954" data-max-h="945"/>NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) is responsible for preserving, monitoring, assessing, and providing public access to the Nation’s treasure of <strong>climate and historical weather data and information</strong>.</p><p> Quick link to home page: <a href="http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/" target="_blank">http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/</a></p><p> Quick link to NCDC’s climate and weather datasets, products, and various web pages and resources: <a href="http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/data-access/quick-links" target="_blank">http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/data-access/quick-links</a></p><p> Quick link to Text & Map Search: <a href="http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/cdo-web/" target="_blank">http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/cdo-web/</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>Internal Revenue Service: Tax Statistics</h3><p><img width="155" height="200" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/155/height/200/486_irs_logo.rev.1407789424.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image486 lw_align_left" srcset="/live/image/scale/2x/gid/4/width/155/height/200/486_irs_logo.rev.1407789424.jpg 2x" data-max-w="463" data-max-h="596"/>Find statistics on business tax, individual tax, charitable and exempt organizations, IRS operations and budget, and income (SOI), as well as statistics by form, products, publications, papers, and other IRS data.</p><p> Quick link to <strong>Tax Statistics, where you will find a wide range of tables, articles, and data</strong> that describe and measure elements of the U.S. tax system: <a href="http://www.irs.gov/uac/Tax-Stats-2" target="_blank">http://www.irs.gov/uac/Tax-Stats-2</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>MapStats</h3><p> A feature of FedStats, MapStats allows users to search for <strong>state, county, city, congressional district, or Federal judicial district data</strong> (demographic, economic, and geographic).</p><p> Quick link: <a href="http://www.fedstats.gov/mapstats/" target="_blank">http://www.fedstats.gov/mapstats/</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>USDA Nutrition Assistance Data</h3><p><img width="180" height="124" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/180/height/124/485_usda_logo.rev.1407789238.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image485 lw_align_right" srcset="/live/image/scale/2x/gid/4/width/180/height/124/485_usda_logo.rev.1407789238.jpg 2x, /live/image/scale/3x/gid/4/width/180/height/124/485_usda_logo.rev.1407789238.jpg 3x" data-max-w="1233" data-max-h="850"/>Data and research regarding the following <strong>USDA Nutrition Assistance</strong> programs are available through this site:</p><ul><li>Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) </li><li>Food Distribution Programs </li><li>School Meals </li><li>Women, Infants and Children </li></ul><p> Quick link: <a href="http://www.fns.usda.gov/data-and-statistics" target="_blank">http://www.fns.usda.gov/data-and-statistics</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>National Center for Education Statistics</h3><p><strong><img width="400" height="80" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/400/height/80/479_nces.rev.1407787656.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image479 lw_align_right" data-max-w="400" data-max-h="80"/>The National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) is the primary federal entity for collecting and analyzing data related to education in the U.S. and other nations.</strong> NCES is located within the U.S. Department of Education and the Institute of Education Sciences. NCES has an extensive Statistical Standards Program that consults and advises on methodological and statistical aspects involved in the design, collection, and analysis of data collections in the Center. To learn more about the NCES, <a href="http://nces.ed.gov/about/" target="_blank">click here</a>.</p><p> Quick link to NCES Data Tools: <a href="http://nces.ed.gov/datatools/index.asp?DataToolSectionID=4" target="_blank">http://nces.ed.gov/datatools/index.asp?DataToolSectionID=4</a></p><p> Quick link to Quick Tables and Figures: <a href="http://nces.ed.gov/quicktables/" target="_blank">http://nces.ed.gov/quicktables/</a></p><p> Quick link to NCES Fast Facts (Note: The primary purpose of the Fast Facts website is to provide users with concise information on a range of educational issues, from early childhood to adult learning.): <a href="http://nces.ed.gov/fastfacts/" target="_blank">http://nces.ed.gov/fastfacts/#</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>The World Bank Data (U.S.)</h3><p><img width="130" height="118" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/130/height/118/484_world-bank-logo.rev.1407788945.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image484 lw_align_left" srcset="/live/image/scale/2x/gid/4/width/130/height/118/484_world-bank-logo.rev.1407788945.jpg 2x, /live/image/scale/3x/gid/4/width/130/height/118/484_world-bank-logo.rev.1407788945.jpg 3x" data-max-w="1406" data-max-h="1275"/>The <strong>World Bank</strong> provides World Development Indicators, Surveys, and data on Finances and Climate Change.</p><p> Quick link: <a href="http://data.worldbank.org/country/united-states" target="_blank">http://data.worldbank.org/country/united-states</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>