• <div class="header-image" style="background-image: url(/live/image/gid/4/2611_Header_V6N2_web_4.rev.1518551584.jpg);">​</div><div class="header-background-color"/>

A Broken Peace in South Sudan

November 29, 2016
The sound of gun shots and mortars ringing out across Juba could only mean one thing in the evening hours of Thursday, July 5th – South Sudan’s fragile peace had met its end. In the days and weeks that have followed those of us who follow the region have watched with increasing anxiety as the world’s youngest country is plunging into conflict for the second time in its short history.

By: David Scollan

Matters of war and peace are not new to South Sudan. Following Sudan’s independence from Britain in 1955 the country has known almost perpetual conflict, the First Sudanese Civil War (1955-1973) and the Second Sudanese Civil War (1983-2005), which left the country’s economy and institutions all but shattered.  In the wake of years of civil war, what was then Sudan’s largely Christian Sub-Saharan south, with ethnic, linguistic, and cultural heritage more closely related to those of its neighbors in East and Central Africa, wrenched itself out of union with the Muslim Arab north of country. Following a referendum in which the people of southern Sudan voted overwhelmingly in favor of independence, on July 9th, 2011, the Republic of South Sudan

became the world’s newest state. With an end to the war and a hard fought independence secured South Sudan at long last was finding peace. That reprieve from violence would not hold for long. In December 2013, the South Sudanese Civil War broke out with President Salva Kiir Mayardit maintaining control against rebel groups led by his former deputy Riek Machar. Ethnic-based violence with Kiir’s majority Dinka forces battling Machar’s rebel Nuer forces marred South Sudan in turmoil for more than a year. Upwards of 300,000 South Sudanese perished. More than

650,000 South Sudanese fled to neighboring states as refugees. Still greater, more than 1.6 million South Sudanese became internally-displaced persons (IDPs), having been forced to leave their homes but not having crossed an international border. All of this death and destruction came to beg the question; would the nation of South Sudan survive at all?

The people of South Sudan and the international community got their answer in August 2015, as the government and rebel forces signed a permanent ceasefire and peace agreement. Yes, for the time being, South Sudan would not completely unravel. President Kiir agreed to bring his rival Machar into government as First Vice President (FVP), apportion more seats in parliament and local legislative assemblies to the opposition, and allow the opposition to make certain national and regional appointments. From day one, however, the government and opposition expressed doubts that the peace could hold. In the months that followed the two sides did not so much share power in one government, but split power in two parallel ones. From separate police forces patrolling the streets to government ministers and their opposition-affiliated deputy ministers vying for control of national departments for the past year South Sudan has, in effect, had two of everything. In doing so, the government and opposition set themselves on a collision course of power politics.

That unwillingness to share power by the leaders of the government and opposition has sowed more seeds of distrust between the everyday soldiers that make up the respective sides’ armies. Those forces are formally the government’s Sudan Peoples’ Liberation Army (SPLA) and the opposition’s Sudan Peoples’ Liberation Army – In Opposition (SPLA-IO), with the latter having split from the former at the beginning of the aforementioned 2013 South Sudanese Civil War.

That misgiving between the low level ranks of the SPLA and SPLA-IO began to boil over in the first week of July with reports of SPLA harassment of and attacks on SPLA-IO soldiers. On July

7th, SPLA and SPLA-IO clashed at a road checkpoint in Juba, the capital, resulting in the deaths of five SPLA soldiers. That was the straw that broke the camel’s back. In the days that followed as President Kiir and FVP Machar met, giving lip service to the peace agreement as their troops fought and died in the streets of Juba. The peace had been broken.

The immediate impact of the fighting in the first week of July in Juba was horrible, with more than two hundred people, mostly soldiers, perishing. However, it is the long term instability that these events have foreshadowed which give this observer pause. Following the initial violence, FVP Machar fled the capital and is reportedly in hiding out of fear for his life. In his absence, in

a move to quell growing unrest in the SPLA-IO ranks and the political opposition, President Kiir has appointed General Taban Deng Gai as First Vice President temporarily. How temporary this interim appointment is remains to be seen. Meanwhile, there are reports that armed violence has taken hold of across South Sudan with both sides and their regional allies engaging in the murder of civilians, rape, destruction of property, and the forced recruitment of child soldiers. More than

60,000 South Sudanese have fled the country with the vast majority, upwards of 50,000 now seeking refugee across the border in Uganda. Appointing a new first vice president has not solved the problem, it is ignoring it.

In response to the government and opposition of South Sudan’s inability to maintain the peace, the international community through regional and supra-national organizations such as the African Union (AU), the Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD), and the United Nations (UN) are mustering support for increased outside involvement to end the violence. IGAD, which is made of countries from the Horn of Africa and African Great Lakes region, is mobilizing in support of a Joint Security Force to demilitarize Juba and provide better protection for civilians. However, President Kiir in an interview on Kenyan television has publicly rebuked these efforts affirming that any foreign force that enters South Sudan without the government’s approval will be treated as “intruders.”

What the future holds for South Sudan this observer cannot say. But, with the peace is broken there is no telling how much longer the world’s youngest country can hold itself together.

 

David Scollan is a rising senior in the College double majoring in African Studies and Political Science with a minor in International Development. This past summer he interned at the United States Department of State’s Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration in the Office of Assistance for Africa’s Horn of Africa policy team.

Student Blog Disclaimer
  • The views expressed on the Student Blog are the author’s opinions and don’t necessarily represent the Penn Wharton Public Policy Initiative’s strategies, recommendations, or opinions.

PENN WHARTON PPI
RESOURCE SPOTLIGHT:

  • <h3>USDA Nutrition Assistance Data</h3><p><img width="180" height="124" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/180/height/124/485_usda_logo.rev.1407789238.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image485 lw_align_right" srcset="/live/image/scale/2x/gid/4/width/180/height/124/485_usda_logo.rev.1407789238.jpg 2x, /live/image/scale/3x/gid/4/width/180/height/124/485_usda_logo.rev.1407789238.jpg 3x" data-max-w="1233" data-max-h="850"/>Data and research regarding the following <strong>USDA Nutrition Assistance</strong> programs are available through this site:</p><ul><li>Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) </li><li>Food Distribution Programs </li><li>School Meals </li><li>Women, Infants and Children </li></ul><p> Quick link: <a href="http://www.fns.usda.gov/data-and-statistics" target="_blank">http://www.fns.usda.gov/data-and-statistics</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>Federal Reserve Economic Data (FRED®)</h3><p><strong><img width="180" height="79" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/180/height/79/481_fred-logo.rev.1407788243.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image481 lw_align_right" data-max-w="222" data-max-h="97"/>An online database consisting of more than 72,000 economic data time series from 54 national, international, public, and private sources.</strong> FRED®, created and maintained by Research Department at the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, goes far beyond simply providing data: It combines data with a powerful mix of tools that help the user understand, interact with, display, and disseminate the data.</p><p> Quick link to data page: <a href="http://research.stlouisfed.org/fred2/tags/series" target="_blank">http://research.stlouisfed.org/fred2/tags/series</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>The Penn World Table</h3><p> The Penn World Table provides purchasing power parity and national income accounts converted to international prices for 189 countries/territories for some or all of the years 1950-2010.</p><p><a href="https://pwt.sas.upenn.edu/php_site/pwt71/pwt71_form.php" target="_blank">Quick link.</a> </p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>The World Bank Data (U.S.)</h3><p><img width="130" height="118" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/130/height/118/484_world-bank-logo.rev.1407788945.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image484 lw_align_left" srcset="/live/image/scale/2x/gid/4/width/130/height/118/484_world-bank-logo.rev.1407788945.jpg 2x, /live/image/scale/3x/gid/4/width/130/height/118/484_world-bank-logo.rev.1407788945.jpg 3x" data-max-w="1406" data-max-h="1275"/>The <strong>World Bank</strong> provides World Development Indicators, Surveys, and data on Finances and Climate Change.</p><p> Quick link: <a href="http://data.worldbank.org/country/united-states" target="_blank">http://data.worldbank.org/country/united-states</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>Internal Revenue Service: Tax Statistics</h3><p><img width="155" height="200" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/155/height/200/486_irs_logo.rev.1407789424.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image486 lw_align_left" srcset="/live/image/scale/2x/gid/4/width/155/height/200/486_irs_logo.rev.1407789424.jpg 2x" data-max-w="463" data-max-h="596"/>Find statistics on business tax, individual tax, charitable and exempt organizations, IRS operations and budget, and income (SOI), as well as statistics by form, products, publications, papers, and other IRS data.</p><p> Quick link to <strong>Tax Statistics, where you will find a wide range of tables, articles, and data</strong> that describe and measure elements of the U.S. tax system: <a href="http://www.irs.gov/uac/Tax-Stats-2" target="_blank">http://www.irs.gov/uac/Tax-Stats-2</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>Federal Aviation Administration: Accident & Incident Data</h3><p><img width="100" height="100" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/100/height/100/80_faa-logo.rev.1402681347.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image80 lw_align_left" srcset="/live/image/scale/2x/gid/4/width/100/height/100/80_faa-logo.rev.1402681347.jpg 2x, /live/image/scale/3x/gid/4/width/100/height/100/80_faa-logo.rev.1402681347.jpg 3x" data-max-w="550" data-max-h="550"/>The NTSB issues an accident report following each investigation. These reports are available online for reports issued since 1996, with older reports coming online soon. The reports listing is sortable by the event date, report date, city, and state.</p><p> Quick link: <a href="http://www.faa.gov/data_research/accident_incident/" target="_blank">http://www.faa.gov/data_research/accident_incident/</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>NOAA National Climatic Data Center</h3><p><img width="200" height="198" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/200/height/198/483_noaa_logo.rev.1407788692.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image483 lw_align_left" srcset="/live/image/scale/2x/gid/4/width/200/height/198/483_noaa_logo.rev.1407788692.jpg 2x, /live/image/scale/3x/gid/4/width/200/height/198/483_noaa_logo.rev.1407788692.jpg 3x" data-max-w="954" data-max-h="945"/>NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) is responsible for preserving, monitoring, assessing, and providing public access to the Nation’s treasure of <strong>climate and historical weather data and information</strong>.</p><p> Quick link to home page: <a href="http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/" target="_blank">http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/</a></p><p> Quick link to NCDC’s climate and weather datasets, products, and various web pages and resources: <a href="http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/data-access/quick-links" target="_blank">http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/data-access/quick-links</a></p><p> Quick link to Text & Map Search: <a href="http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/cdo-web/" target="_blank">http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/cdo-web/</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>National Center for Education Statistics</h3><p><strong><img width="400" height="80" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/400/height/80/479_nces.rev.1407787656.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image479 lw_align_right" data-max-w="400" data-max-h="80"/>The National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) is the primary federal entity for collecting and analyzing data related to education in the U.S. and other nations.</strong> NCES is located within the U.S. Department of Education and the Institute of Education Sciences. NCES has an extensive Statistical Standards Program that consults and advises on methodological and statistical aspects involved in the design, collection, and analysis of data collections in the Center. To learn more about the NCES, <a href="http://nces.ed.gov/about/" target="_blank">click here</a>.</p><p> Quick link to NCES Data Tools: <a href="http://nces.ed.gov/datatools/index.asp?DataToolSectionID=4" target="_blank">http://nces.ed.gov/datatools/index.asp?DataToolSectionID=4</a></p><p> Quick link to Quick Tables and Figures: <a href="http://nces.ed.gov/quicktables/" target="_blank">http://nces.ed.gov/quicktables/</a></p><p> Quick link to NCES Fast Facts (Note: The primary purpose of the Fast Facts website is to provide users with concise information on a range of educational issues, from early childhood to adult learning.): <a href="http://nces.ed.gov/fastfacts/" target="_blank">http://nces.ed.gov/fastfacts/#</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>Congressional Budget Office</h3><p><img width="180" height="180" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/180/height/180/380_cbo-logo.rev.1406822035.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image380 lw_align_right" data-max-w="180" data-max-h="180"/>Since its founding in 1974, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) has produced independent analyses of budgetary and economic issues to support the Congressional budget process.</p><p> The agency is strictly nonpartisan and conducts objective, impartial analysis, which is evident in each of the dozens of reports and hundreds of cost estimates that its economists and policy analysts produce each year. CBO does not make policy recommendations, and each report and cost estimate discloses the agency’s assumptions and methodologies. <strong>CBO provides budgetary and economic information in a variety of ways and at various points in the legislative process.</strong> Products include baseline budget projections and economic forecasts, analysis of the President’s budget, cost estimates, analysis of federal mandates, working papers, and more.</p><p> Quick link to Products page: <a href="http://www.cbo.gov/about/our-products" target="_blank">http://www.cbo.gov/about/our-products</a></p><p> Quick link to Topics: <a href="http://www.cbo.gov/topics" target="_blank">http://www.cbo.gov/topics</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>HUD State of the Cities Data Systems</h3><p><strong><img width="200" height="200" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/200/height/200/482_hud_logo.rev.1407788472.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image482 lw_align_left" srcset="/live/image/scale/2x/gid/4/width/200/height/200/482_hud_logo.rev.1407788472.jpg 2x, /live/image/scale/3x/gid/4/width/200/height/200/482_hud_logo.rev.1407788472.jpg 3x" data-max-w="612" data-max-h="613"/>The SOCDS provides data for individual Metropolitan Areas, Central Cities, and Suburbs.</strong> It is a portal for non-national data made available through a number of outside institutions (e.g. Census, BLS, FBI and others).</p><p> Quick link: <a href="http://www.huduser.org/portal/datasets/socds.html" target="_blank">http://www.huduser.org/portal/datasets/socds.html</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>MapStats</h3><p> A feature of FedStats, MapStats allows users to search for <strong>state, county, city, congressional district, or Federal judicial district data</strong> (demographic, economic, and geographic).</p><p> Quick link: <a href="http://www.fedstats.gov/mapstats/" target="_blank">http://www.fedstats.gov/mapstats/</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>National Bureau of Economic Research (Public Use Data Archive)</h3><p><img width="180" height="43" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/180/height/43/478_nber.rev.1407530465.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image478 lw_align_right" data-max-w="329" data-max-h="79"/>Founded in 1920, the <strong>National Bureau of Economic Research</strong> is a private, nonprofit, nonpartisan research organization dedicated to promoting a greater understanding of how the economy works. The NBER is committed to undertaking and disseminating unbiased economic research among public policymakers, business professionals, and the academic community.</p><p> Quick Link to <strong>Public Use Data Archive</strong>: <a href="http://www.nber.org/data/" target="_blank">http://www.nber.org/data/</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>