• <div class="header-image" style="background-image: url(/live/image/gid/4/2756_V6N7Web_Header_small.rev.1533574420.jpg);">​</div><div class="header-background-color"/>

Fighting Discrimination at the Department of Defense

November 16, 2016
The last day of Pride month this year added a major milestone for the Department of Defense (“DoD” or “the Department”). Defense Secretary Ash Carter announced that, effective immediately, transgender service members would be allowed to serve openly in the U.S. military [1]. This policy decision extends across all military departments and services. Such an announcement garnered both positive and negative feedback to the Department. Despite personal opinions on this new policy, changes are necessary and inevitable to address the growing needs of a diverse force.

By Persephone Tan

At the Department, the Office of Diversity Management and Equal Opportunity (ODMEO) is the primary organization responsible for developing policy to ensure changes like this are institutional. ODMEO is aligned with the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness (OUSD P&R), whose mission is to recruit and retain a highly qualified force to serve both the military and civilians.

ODMEO is charged with developing diversity policies and programs that covers both civilian employees and military members. Other programs that ODMEO support are Military Equal Opportunity (MEO), Civilian Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO), the Disability Program, Diversity and Inclusion, and an outreach component.

Last year also marked a historic moment. When DoD announced that service members were allowed to serve openly as gay, lesbian, or bisexual, ODMEO put the language into its military equal opportunity (MEO) program to set a policy that protects service members and to include “sexual orientation” as a basis of discrimination. Adding “gender identity” to ODMEO’s umbrella policy on diversity management and equal opportunity in the DoD requires an extensive process for editing DoD directives [2]. After all, any changes to the directive will impact all levels of the Department. This includes how the updated policy will affect the types of training offered to staff and how sensitive cases and transgender-related complaints are handled. Other concerns include medical coverage and data collection.

At ODMEO, I support staff on policies pertaining to three issue areas: sexual harassment, hazing and bullying, and most recently, gender identity. These are a few of many priorities that the Department must address. I attended working group meetings with subject matter experts (SMEs) from DoD and across the Services who collaborate together to develop criteria, metrics, and procedures to tackle different cases of harassment and discrimination. Working groups are comprised of military and civilian advocates who specialize in particular areas and are usually the point of contact who would address such issues. They meet regularly to coordinate ongoing action plans and meet deadlines, providing a forum to address issues both internal and external to the Department.

For example, issues and concerns of sexual harassment, separate from sexual assault, remains a priority for the DoD. The Department has a working group that focuses on developing sexual harassment policy. The U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) published a report in 2011 on “Preventing Sexual Harassment: DOD Needs Greater Leadership Commitment and an Oversight Framework” [3]. This report outlines the prevalence of incidents and refers to a survey conducted by DoD on active duty service members who reported incidents of sexual harassment. Recommendations were provided on how DOD can improve its commitment to preventing sexual harassment incidences and hold service members in leadership positions accountable for engaging in such actions. The sexual harassment working group is incorporating this feedback when establishing policy to examine how the military currently handles cases and how data is collected for formal and informal complaints.

The Department has also taken recent prominent issues into account. Many cases of military hazing and bullying indicate the need to strengthen policies to track complaints and hold military leaders accountable for such problematic behavior. Understanding this context is vital for ODMEO to fully incorporate all the implications and consequences of policies that emerge from this office. Currently, ODMEO staff leads working groups to address issues of sexual harassment and hazing and bullying.

Reviewing existing issuances and attending working group meetings trained me to critically analyze the use and placement of words in the directives. Words account for a lot of scrutiny and depending on who is in a working group, each office will want to make sure the interests of their constituencies (i.e. each military branch) are vocalized and protected. To mitigate any potential conflicts with the new transgender policy, I met with the Office of the General Counsel and learned to craft language appropriate for incorporating “gender identity.” Under the Secretary of Defense’s direction to prioritize the inclusion of transgender service members, I coordinated with internal staff to ensure that the updated policy follows an expedited schedule of incorporating changes.

At ODMEO I offered “third party” insight, questions, and concerns on the content of the policies drafted for review. I identified sections in the existing directive to incorporate the new changes for the transgender policy. I drafted edits for pre-coordination which requires a bureaucratic process of internal approval, formal coordination, legal review, assessment and authorization from multiple offices. Currently, the policy is undergoing coordination for review. As my time at ODMEO comes to an end, there are three major lessons I’ve learned about policymaking at the Department:

  1. When the Secretary of Defense announces a policy change and/or if there is political demand for information from the Pentagon, the DoD staff must work quickly to oblige and accommodate. Not only is it important to respond immediately to these urgent calls, but there must be a plan of action that often involves a thorough process to avoid discrepancies and to prevent further mistreatment for both military service members and civilians.
  2. There is an extensive internal process to make even the slightest change (i.e. adding one or two words), especially to an umbrella policy. The process involves many stakeholders and steps, but is also comprehensive and thorough. This coordination requires time, patience, open-mindedness, compromise, diligence, analytical skills, critical thinking, and constructive feedback.
  3. Cooperation with everyone is imperative, while advocating for the interests of those marginalized.

 References

  [1] June 30, 2016. [Online]. Available: http://www.defense.gov/News/Special-Reports/0616_transgender-policy. [Accessed: July 26, 2016].

  [2] [Online]. Available: http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/writing/dod_process.html. [Accessed: July 26, 2016].

  [3] United States Government Accountability Office, “Preventing Sexual Harassment: DOD Needs Greater Leadership Commitment and an Oversight Framework,” September 2011. [Internet Document]. Available: http://www.gao.gov/assets/590/585344.pdf. [Accessed: July 26, 2016].

Student Blog Disclaimer
  • The views expressed on the Student Blog are the author’s opinions and don’t necessarily represent the Penn Wharton Public Policy Initiative’s strategies, recommendations, or opinions.

PENN WHARTON PPI
RESOURCE SPOTLIGHT:

  • <h3>MapStats</h3><p> A feature of FedStats, MapStats allows users to search for <strong>state, county, city, congressional district, or Federal judicial district data</strong> (demographic, economic, and geographic).</p><p> Quick link: <a href="http://www.fedstats.gov/mapstats/" target="_blank">http://www.fedstats.gov/mapstats/</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>Internal Revenue Service: Tax Statistics</h3><p><img width="155" height="200" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/155/height/200/486_irs_logo.rev.1407789424.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image486 lw_align_left" srcset="/live/image/scale/2x/gid/4/width/155/height/200/486_irs_logo.rev.1407789424.jpg 2x" data-max-w="463" data-max-h="596"/>Find statistics on business tax, individual tax, charitable and exempt organizations, IRS operations and budget, and income (SOI), as well as statistics by form, products, publications, papers, and other IRS data.</p><p> Quick link to <strong>Tax Statistics, where you will find a wide range of tables, articles, and data</strong> that describe and measure elements of the U.S. tax system: <a href="http://www.irs.gov/uac/Tax-Stats-2" target="_blank">http://www.irs.gov/uac/Tax-Stats-2</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>Congressional Budget Office</h3><p><img width="180" height="180" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/180/height/180/380_cbo-logo.rev.1406822035.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image380 lw_align_right" data-max-w="180" data-max-h="180"/>Since its founding in 1974, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) has produced independent analyses of budgetary and economic issues to support the Congressional budget process.</p><p> The agency is strictly nonpartisan and conducts objective, impartial analysis, which is evident in each of the dozens of reports and hundreds of cost estimates that its economists and policy analysts produce each year. CBO does not make policy recommendations, and each report and cost estimate discloses the agency’s assumptions and methodologies. <strong>CBO provides budgetary and economic information in a variety of ways and at various points in the legislative process.</strong> Products include baseline budget projections and economic forecasts, analysis of the President’s budget, cost estimates, analysis of federal mandates, working papers, and more.</p><p> Quick link to Products page: <a href="http://www.cbo.gov/about/our-products" target="_blank">http://www.cbo.gov/about/our-products</a></p><p> Quick link to Topics: <a href="http://www.cbo.gov/topics" target="_blank">http://www.cbo.gov/topics</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>USDA Nutrition Assistance Data</h3><p><img width="180" height="124" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/180/height/124/485_usda_logo.rev.1407789238.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image485 lw_align_right" srcset="/live/image/scale/2x/gid/4/width/180/height/124/485_usda_logo.rev.1407789238.jpg 2x, /live/image/scale/3x/gid/4/width/180/height/124/485_usda_logo.rev.1407789238.jpg 3x" data-max-w="1233" data-max-h="850"/>Data and research regarding the following <strong>USDA Nutrition Assistance</strong> programs are available through this site:</p><ul><li>Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) </li><li>Food Distribution Programs </li><li>School Meals </li><li>Women, Infants and Children </li></ul><p> Quick link: <a href="http://www.fns.usda.gov/data-and-statistics" target="_blank">http://www.fns.usda.gov/data-and-statistics</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>Federal Aviation Administration: Accident & Incident Data</h3><p><img width="100" height="100" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/100/height/100/80_faa-logo.rev.1402681347.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image80 lw_align_left" srcset="/live/image/scale/2x/gid/4/width/100/height/100/80_faa-logo.rev.1402681347.jpg 2x, /live/image/scale/3x/gid/4/width/100/height/100/80_faa-logo.rev.1402681347.jpg 3x" data-max-w="550" data-max-h="550"/>The NTSB issues an accident report following each investigation. These reports are available online for reports issued since 1996, with older reports coming online soon. The reports listing is sortable by the event date, report date, city, and state.</p><p> Quick link: <a href="http://www.faa.gov/data_research/accident_incident/" target="_blank">http://www.faa.gov/data_research/accident_incident/</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>Federal Reserve Economic Data (FRED®)</h3><p><strong><img width="180" height="79" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/180/height/79/481_fred-logo.rev.1407788243.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image481 lw_align_right" data-max-w="222" data-max-h="97"/>An online database consisting of more than 72,000 economic data time series from 54 national, international, public, and private sources.</strong> FRED®, created and maintained by Research Department at the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, goes far beyond simply providing data: It combines data with a powerful mix of tools that help the user understand, interact with, display, and disseminate the data.</p><p> Quick link to data page: <a href="http://research.stlouisfed.org/fred2/tags/series" target="_blank">http://research.stlouisfed.org/fred2/tags/series</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>NOAA National Climatic Data Center</h3><p><img width="200" height="198" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/200/height/198/483_noaa_logo.rev.1407788692.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image483 lw_align_left" srcset="/live/image/scale/2x/gid/4/width/200/height/198/483_noaa_logo.rev.1407788692.jpg 2x, /live/image/scale/3x/gid/4/width/200/height/198/483_noaa_logo.rev.1407788692.jpg 3x" data-max-w="954" data-max-h="945"/>NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) is responsible for preserving, monitoring, assessing, and providing public access to the Nation’s treasure of <strong>climate and historical weather data and information</strong>.</p><p> Quick link to home page: <a href="http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/" target="_blank">http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/</a></p><p> Quick link to NCDC’s climate and weather datasets, products, and various web pages and resources: <a href="http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/data-access/quick-links" target="_blank">http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/data-access/quick-links</a></p><p> Quick link to Text & Map Search: <a href="http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/cdo-web/" target="_blank">http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/cdo-web/</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>National Center for Education Statistics</h3><p><strong><img width="400" height="80" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/400/height/80/479_nces.rev.1407787656.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image479 lw_align_right" data-max-w="400" data-max-h="80"/>The National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) is the primary federal entity for collecting and analyzing data related to education in the U.S. and other nations.</strong> NCES is located within the U.S. Department of Education and the Institute of Education Sciences. NCES has an extensive Statistical Standards Program that consults and advises on methodological and statistical aspects involved in the design, collection, and analysis of data collections in the Center. To learn more about the NCES, <a href="http://nces.ed.gov/about/" target="_blank">click here</a>.</p><p> Quick link to NCES Data Tools: <a href="http://nces.ed.gov/datatools/index.asp?DataToolSectionID=4" target="_blank">http://nces.ed.gov/datatools/index.asp?DataToolSectionID=4</a></p><p> Quick link to Quick Tables and Figures: <a href="http://nces.ed.gov/quicktables/" target="_blank">http://nces.ed.gov/quicktables/</a></p><p> Quick link to NCES Fast Facts (Note: The primary purpose of the Fast Facts website is to provide users with concise information on a range of educational issues, from early childhood to adult learning.): <a href="http://nces.ed.gov/fastfacts/" target="_blank">http://nces.ed.gov/fastfacts/#</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>HUD State of the Cities Data Systems</h3><p><strong><img width="200" height="200" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/200/height/200/482_hud_logo.rev.1407788472.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image482 lw_align_left" srcset="/live/image/scale/2x/gid/4/width/200/height/200/482_hud_logo.rev.1407788472.jpg 2x, /live/image/scale/3x/gid/4/width/200/height/200/482_hud_logo.rev.1407788472.jpg 3x" data-max-w="612" data-max-h="613"/>The SOCDS provides data for individual Metropolitan Areas, Central Cities, and Suburbs.</strong> It is a portal for non-national data made available through a number of outside institutions (e.g. Census, BLS, FBI and others).</p><p> Quick link: <a href="http://www.huduser.org/portal/datasets/socds.html" target="_blank">http://www.huduser.org/portal/datasets/socds.html</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>The Penn World Table</h3><p> The Penn World Table provides purchasing power parity and national income accounts converted to international prices for 189 countries/territories for some or all of the years 1950-2010.</p><p><a href="https://pwt.sas.upenn.edu/php_site/pwt71/pwt71_form.php" target="_blank">Quick link.</a> </p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>The World Bank Data (U.S.)</h3><p><img width="130" height="118" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/130/height/118/484_world-bank-logo.rev.1407788945.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image484 lw_align_left" srcset="/live/image/scale/2x/gid/4/width/130/height/118/484_world-bank-logo.rev.1407788945.jpg 2x, /live/image/scale/3x/gid/4/width/130/height/118/484_world-bank-logo.rev.1407788945.jpg 3x" data-max-w="1406" data-max-h="1275"/>The <strong>World Bank</strong> provides World Development Indicators, Surveys, and data on Finances and Climate Change.</p><p> Quick link: <a href="http://data.worldbank.org/country/united-states" target="_blank">http://data.worldbank.org/country/united-states</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>National Bureau of Economic Research (Public Use Data Archive)</h3><p><img width="180" height="43" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/180/height/43/478_nber.rev.1407530465.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image478 lw_align_right" data-max-w="329" data-max-h="79"/>Founded in 1920, the <strong>National Bureau of Economic Research</strong> is a private, nonprofit, nonpartisan research organization dedicated to promoting a greater understanding of how the economy works. The NBER is committed to undertaking and disseminating unbiased economic research among public policymakers, business professionals, and the academic community.</p><p> Quick Link to <strong>Public Use Data Archive</strong>: <a href="http://www.nber.org/data/" target="_blank">http://www.nber.org/data/</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>