• <div class="header-image" style="background-image: url(/live/image/gid/4/2897_V6N9_Header.rev.1540219621.jpg);">​</div><div class="header-background-color"/>

Educating Girls: The Multiplier Effect

October 27, 2016
In Pakistan, sixty-two percent of females between the ages of seven and sixteen have never set foot in a school. As a Pakistani-American, statistics about the country of my birth never fail to make my stomach lurch. Had I been born to a family one block away from where mine currently lives, I very easily could have been one of the three million girls in Pakistan not enrolled in school. [1]

by Rahima Jamal

This summer, I am interning at the United States Agency for International Development, an executive agency with the mission to end extreme poverty and promote, resilient, democratic societies while advancing the United States security and prosperity. My primary focus for the summer is researching gender and social inclusion. Throughout my daily work, I frequently encounter harrowing statistics that paint a bleak picture of the status of girls in the developing world. Two-thirds of the 774 million illiterate people in the world are female. 62 million girls are not in school. 17 million girls are never expected to ever enter a school. [1] These unimaginably large numbers may make it seem as though no change can ever make a significant impact on the education prospects of girls in the developing world. However, with each statistic, my will to make a difference increases. Thankfully, USAID and other developmental organizations fully understand the benefit of investing in education for girls and have made it a priority in their work.

A girl’s education has an immeasurable impact on her family, community, and country as as a whole. Education has the ability to decrease infant mortality, increase wages, improve nutrition, boost a country’s economy, and decrease the number of child marriages in the developing world. Perhaps most importantly, education empowers girls to understand their full potential. When girls and young women are educated, they have a greater awareness of their rights and confidence in their ability to make decisions. In turn, girls create change in their lives that improves their health and economic prospects. Ensuring that girls stay in school is also one of the most effective ways of decreasing child marriage and early births, a key factor in lowering birth and maternal mortality rates. Each extra year of a mother’s education reduces the likelihood of infant mortality by five to ten percent and increases a women’s future earning by ten to twenty percent. [1]

Although the positive impacts of educating girls are apparent to developmental organizations like USAID, countries are unable to enact sweeping change for a variety of reasons, such as a lack of financial resources. However, one of the most significant obstacles to educating girls is the ingrained belief that women are inferior to men, and, as such, do not deserve the same opportunities or equitable treatment. In order to deconstruct these notions and promote the education of adolescent girls worldwide, the United States government has created the Let Girls Learn initiative. The US government has made educating girls a priority in their developmental efforts. Through collaboration with the White House, Peace Corps, and Department of State, USAID’s Let Girls Learn approach consists of three main pillars: increasing access to quality education, reducing barriers to success, and empowering adolescent girls. [2]

USAID seeks to increase access to quality education by implementing programs that teach girls to read and write, ensuring that girls affected by crises have access to education, and implementing workforce development programming. For example, the Safer Schools program implemented in Pakistan strives to ensure that children affected by humanitarian crises have access to education. [2] This program will benefit 53,000 children displaced from North Waziristan. Over 10,000 children, nearly half of whom are girls, have been enrolled in Temporary Learning Centers. Over 100 teachers have also been trained in psychosocial support and with techniques for teaching in challenging environments. [3]

By reducing barriers to girls’ education, USAID focuses on eliminating the vulnerabilities that may prevent girls from attending school in the first place. These challenges include early marriage, malnutrition, menstruation, and gender-based violence. For example, the Protecting Human Rights Program in Bangladesh works to reduce child marriage by spearheading a public awareness campaign for more than ten thousand primary school students about their rights relating to child marriage and the negative effects it has on a girl’s future prospects. [2]This five-year program, started in March 2011, is being implemented across the country by Plan International. The program works in collaboration with the Bangladesh National Woman Lawyers’ Association, as well as eleven local organizations at the district and union levels. [4]

Finally, by empowering adolescent girls, USAID focuses on increasing girls’ rights, leadership, and opportunity by cultivating skills, such as mathematics, science, engineering, and agriculture.  Furthermore, it also works to transform toxic gender norms that lead to gender-based violence by encouraging community engagement and communication. For example, the Women and Girls Lead Global program combines multiple forms of media to shift gender norms and empower women and girls. [2] The partnership includes a ten-episode documentary film series featuring women and girls persevering challenging circumstances to better their lives, their families, and their communities. Currently implemented in Bangladesh, Colombia, El Salvador, India, Jordan, Kenya, Malawi, and Peru, the programs seeks to combine the power of media with locally-led campaigns to address the challenges girls face across the world. The campaign has reached 26,000 people in more than 100 communities in Bangladesh alone.[5]

USAID’s multi-faceted approach to increasing the education prospects of girls in the developing world has resulted in girls worldwide realizing their full potential. Although the challenge is certainly great, investing in a girl’s education leads to a powerful multiplier effect on her family, community, and economy. As a Pakistani-female myself, I fully recognize the importance of USAID’s work. Although I was privileged enough to receive an exceptional education in the United States, I will strive to make sure that Pakistani females are not left behind.

Watch more: https://www.usaid.gov/letgirlslearn

References

  [1] “Girls’ Education – The Facts”, United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, 2013. http://en.unesco.org/gem-report/sites/gem-report/files/girls-factsheet-en.pdf 7/16/2016. 

  [2] “Let Girls Learn”, United States Agency for International Development, 2016. https://www.usaid.gov/letgirlslearn 7/16/2016.

  [3] “United States Awards $4.6 million to UNICEF for Pakistan Safer Schools Program” Embassy of the United States, 2015. http://islamabad.usembassy.gov/pr011515.html 8/2/2016.

  [4] “Bangladesh: Protecting Human Rights”, Plan International, 2016. https://www.planusa.org/bangladesh-protecting-human-rights 8/2/2016.

  [5] “Women and Girls Lead Global Partnership” United States Agency for International Development, 2016. https://www.usaid.gov/what-we-do/gender-equality-and-womens-empowerment/women-and-girls-lead-global 8/2/2016.

Student Blog Disclaimer
  • The views expressed on the Student Blog are the author’s opinions and don’t necessarily represent the Penn Wharton Public Policy Initiative’s strategies, recommendations, or opinions.

PENN WHARTON PPI
RESOURCE SPOTLIGHT:

  • <h3>National Bureau of Economic Research (Public Use Data Archive)</h3><p><img width="180" height="43" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/180/height/43/478_nber.rev.1407530465.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image478 lw_align_right" data-max-w="329" data-max-h="79"/>Founded in 1920, the <strong>National Bureau of Economic Research</strong> is a private, nonprofit, nonpartisan research organization dedicated to promoting a greater understanding of how the economy works. The NBER is committed to undertaking and disseminating unbiased economic research among public policymakers, business professionals, and the academic community.</p><p> Quick Link to <strong>Public Use Data Archive</strong>: <a href="http://www.nber.org/data/" target="_blank">http://www.nber.org/data/</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>The Penn World Table</h3><p> The Penn World Table provides purchasing power parity and national income accounts converted to international prices for 189 countries/territories for some or all of the years 1950-2010.</p><p><a href="https://pwt.sas.upenn.edu/php_site/pwt71/pwt71_form.php" target="_blank">Quick link.</a> </p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>Internal Revenue Service: Tax Statistics</h3><p><img width="155" height="200" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/155/height/200/486_irs_logo.rev.1407789424.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image486 lw_align_left" srcset="/live/image/scale/2x/gid/4/width/155/height/200/486_irs_logo.rev.1407789424.jpg 2x" data-max-w="463" data-max-h="596"/>Find statistics on business tax, individual tax, charitable and exempt organizations, IRS operations and budget, and income (SOI), as well as statistics by form, products, publications, papers, and other IRS data.</p><p> Quick link to <strong>Tax Statistics, where you will find a wide range of tables, articles, and data</strong> that describe and measure elements of the U.S. tax system: <a href="http://www.irs.gov/uac/Tax-Stats-2" target="_blank">http://www.irs.gov/uac/Tax-Stats-2</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>National Center for Education Statistics</h3><p><strong><img width="400" height="80" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/400/height/80/479_nces.rev.1407787656.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image479 lw_align_right" data-max-w="400" data-max-h="80"/>The National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) is the primary federal entity for collecting and analyzing data related to education in the U.S. and other nations.</strong> NCES is located within the U.S. Department of Education and the Institute of Education Sciences. NCES has an extensive Statistical Standards Program that consults and advises on methodological and statistical aspects involved in the design, collection, and analysis of data collections in the Center. To learn more about the NCES, <a href="http://nces.ed.gov/about/" target="_blank">click here</a>.</p><p> Quick link to NCES Data Tools: <a href="http://nces.ed.gov/datatools/index.asp?DataToolSectionID=4" target="_blank">http://nces.ed.gov/datatools/index.asp?DataToolSectionID=4</a></p><p> Quick link to Quick Tables and Figures: <a href="http://nces.ed.gov/quicktables/" target="_blank">http://nces.ed.gov/quicktables/</a></p><p> Quick link to NCES Fast Facts (Note: The primary purpose of the Fast Facts website is to provide users with concise information on a range of educational issues, from early childhood to adult learning.): <a href="http://nces.ed.gov/fastfacts/" target="_blank">http://nces.ed.gov/fastfacts/#</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>HUD State of the Cities Data Systems</h3><p><strong><img width="200" height="200" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/200/height/200/482_hud_logo.rev.1407788472.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image482 lw_align_left" srcset="/live/image/scale/2x/gid/4/width/200/height/200/482_hud_logo.rev.1407788472.jpg 2x, /live/image/scale/3x/gid/4/width/200/height/200/482_hud_logo.rev.1407788472.jpg 3x" data-max-w="612" data-max-h="613"/>The SOCDS provides data for individual Metropolitan Areas, Central Cities, and Suburbs.</strong> It is a portal for non-national data made available through a number of outside institutions (e.g. Census, BLS, FBI and others).</p><p> Quick link: <a href="http://www.huduser.org/portal/datasets/socds.html" target="_blank">http://www.huduser.org/portal/datasets/socds.html</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>Federal Aviation Administration: Accident & Incident Data</h3><p><img width="100" height="100" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/100/height/100/80_faa-logo.rev.1402681347.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image80 lw_align_left" srcset="/live/image/scale/2x/gid/4/width/100/height/100/80_faa-logo.rev.1402681347.jpg 2x, /live/image/scale/3x/gid/4/width/100/height/100/80_faa-logo.rev.1402681347.jpg 3x" data-max-w="550" data-max-h="550"/>The NTSB issues an accident report following each investigation. These reports are available online for reports issued since 1996, with older reports coming online soon. The reports listing is sortable by the event date, report date, city, and state.</p><p> Quick link: <a href="http://www.faa.gov/data_research/accident_incident/" target="_blank">http://www.faa.gov/data_research/accident_incident/</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>USDA Nutrition Assistance Data</h3><p><img width="180" height="124" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/180/height/124/485_usda_logo.rev.1407789238.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image485 lw_align_right" srcset="/live/image/scale/2x/gid/4/width/180/height/124/485_usda_logo.rev.1407789238.jpg 2x, /live/image/scale/3x/gid/4/width/180/height/124/485_usda_logo.rev.1407789238.jpg 3x" data-max-w="1233" data-max-h="850"/>Data and research regarding the following <strong>USDA Nutrition Assistance</strong> programs are available through this site:</p><ul><li>Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) </li><li>Food Distribution Programs </li><li>School Meals </li><li>Women, Infants and Children </li></ul><p> Quick link: <a href="http://www.fns.usda.gov/data-and-statistics" target="_blank">http://www.fns.usda.gov/data-and-statistics</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>Congressional Budget Office</h3><p><img width="180" height="180" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/180/height/180/380_cbo-logo.rev.1406822035.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image380 lw_align_right" data-max-w="180" data-max-h="180"/>Since its founding in 1974, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) has produced independent analyses of budgetary and economic issues to support the Congressional budget process.</p><p> The agency is strictly nonpartisan and conducts objective, impartial analysis, which is evident in each of the dozens of reports and hundreds of cost estimates that its economists and policy analysts produce each year. CBO does not make policy recommendations, and each report and cost estimate discloses the agency’s assumptions and methodologies. <strong>CBO provides budgetary and economic information in a variety of ways and at various points in the legislative process.</strong> Products include baseline budget projections and economic forecasts, analysis of the President’s budget, cost estimates, analysis of federal mandates, working papers, and more.</p><p> Quick link to Products page: <a href="http://www.cbo.gov/about/our-products" target="_blank">http://www.cbo.gov/about/our-products</a></p><p> Quick link to Topics: <a href="http://www.cbo.gov/topics" target="_blank">http://www.cbo.gov/topics</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>NOAA National Climatic Data Center</h3><p><img width="200" height="198" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/200/height/198/483_noaa_logo.rev.1407788692.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image483 lw_align_left" srcset="/live/image/scale/2x/gid/4/width/200/height/198/483_noaa_logo.rev.1407788692.jpg 2x, /live/image/scale/3x/gid/4/width/200/height/198/483_noaa_logo.rev.1407788692.jpg 3x" data-max-w="954" data-max-h="945"/>NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) is responsible for preserving, monitoring, assessing, and providing public access to the Nation’s treasure of <strong>climate and historical weather data and information</strong>.</p><p> Quick link to home page: <a href="http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/" target="_blank">http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/</a></p><p> Quick link to NCDC’s climate and weather datasets, products, and various web pages and resources: <a href="http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/data-access/quick-links" target="_blank">http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/data-access/quick-links</a></p><p> Quick link to Text & Map Search: <a href="http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/cdo-web/" target="_blank">http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/cdo-web/</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>Federal Reserve Economic Data (FRED®)</h3><p><strong><img width="180" height="79" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/180/height/79/481_fred-logo.rev.1407788243.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image481 lw_align_right" data-max-w="222" data-max-h="97"/>An online database consisting of more than 72,000 economic data time series from 54 national, international, public, and private sources.</strong> FRED®, created and maintained by Research Department at the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, goes far beyond simply providing data: It combines data with a powerful mix of tools that help the user understand, interact with, display, and disseminate the data.</p><p> Quick link to data page: <a href="http://research.stlouisfed.org/fred2/tags/series" target="_blank">http://research.stlouisfed.org/fred2/tags/series</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>MapStats</h3><p> A feature of FedStats, MapStats allows users to search for <strong>state, county, city, congressional district, or Federal judicial district data</strong> (demographic, economic, and geographic).</p><p> Quick link: <a href="http://www.fedstats.gov/mapstats/" target="_blank">http://www.fedstats.gov/mapstats/</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>
  • <h3>The World Bank Data (U.S.)</h3><p><img width="130" height="118" alt="" src="/live/image/gid/4/width/130/height/118/484_world-bank-logo.rev.1407788945.jpg" class="lw_image lw_image484 lw_align_left" srcset="/live/image/scale/2x/gid/4/width/130/height/118/484_world-bank-logo.rev.1407788945.jpg 2x, /live/image/scale/3x/gid/4/width/130/height/118/484_world-bank-logo.rev.1407788945.jpg 3x" data-max-w="1406" data-max-h="1275"/>The <strong>World Bank</strong> provides World Development Indicators, Surveys, and data on Finances and Climate Change.</p><p> Quick link: <a href="http://data.worldbank.org/country/united-states" target="_blank">http://data.worldbank.org/country/united-states</a></p><p>See all <a href="/data-resources/">data and resources</a> »</p>