About B-School

The Wharton School, founded in 1881 at the University of Pennsylvania by entrepreneur and industrialist Joseph Wharton, is the world’s first collegiate business school (“B-School”). The School maintains a long tradition of educating visionary leaders in the private and public sectors, and Wharton’s 235-plus professors constitute one of the largest, most published faculties at any business school. The Wharton B-School for Public Policy makes their expertise accessible in DC, through a series of monthly, 90-minute, faculty-led seminars on Capitol Hill, aimed at giving Congressional staffers a deeper understanding of the economic underpinnings and implications of public policy.

Jennifer Blouin, Professor of Accounting, Wharton School of BusinessJennifer Blouin, Professor of Accounting, Wharton School of Business

Written summaries of past DC seminars and podcasts of interviews with participating faculty, developed in collaboration with Knowledge@Wharton, the Wharton School’s online business journal, are available online.

 

 

What Participants are Saying

Professor Kevin Werbach was fantastic. Great balance between history, context, challenges from legal, social, and tech perspectives.

~Anonymous

  


B-School Podcasts

  • Antitrust in Labor Markets: How it Relates to Big Tech

    Big U.S. tech companies like Apple, Alphabet, Facebook, and others, are coming under fire for being monopolies that should be broken up. This is what we have been hearing from Democratic Presidential candidates like Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren and Minnesota Senator Amy Klobuchar. It is an idea that is gaining steam as these tech giants face accusations of violating privacy rights, squeezing out competitors, and spreading misinformation. A new 150-page report commissioned by the British government includes many of those similar criticisms and say the existing rules governing these companies are outdated and need to be strengthened. And the European Union has repeatedly fined big tech companies. So is it time for the U.S. to look at whether the tech industry is too big and make some changes?
  • Nation Branding: Which Countries Ranked Highest This Year?

    Every year, US News and World Report compiles a list of the best countries, the list looks at a country’s wealth and success, but also policies that create opportunity, the people that lead the change, and that country’s history. The 2019 list was just released, and joining us to highlight this year’s list, the man who compiles it, Wharton marketing professor Dave Reibstein.
  • Regulatory Responses to the Sharing Economy, Autonomous Vehicles, and Disruptive Innovation

    Technology-based companies such as Uber and Airbnb have disrupted more than just their business sectors. They’ve raised complicated questions about how they should be regulated and by whom. New research from Wharton could help decision-makers sort out the answers. Professor Light joined the Knowledge@Wharton radio show on SiriusXM to explain.
  • The Economics of Universal Basic Income

    The Alaska Permanent Fund has been issuing a cash transfer to every man, woman and child in Alaska since the early 1980s. The fund is provided through dividends invested from oil revenues, which is obviously a big part of that state. But can a similar Universal Basic Income program work across all of the US? And would providing such a program mean any change to working patterns in the United States?

  • The Role of Government in Fixing America’s Aging Infrastructure

    Infrastructure is one of the key issues on the American political agenda. How to finance and manage the rebuilding of America’s aging infrastructure was the topic of a B-School for public policy seminar. Professor Bob Inman provided an overview of the economic and political factors that influence the financing and management aspects as well as provided an analytical framework, highlighting the way in which economists, with their focus on efficiency, differ from engineers in analyzing infrastructure investments. To share his insights with a wider audience, Professor Inman joined the Knowledge@Wharton radio show, which airs on SiriusXM Channel 111, to discuss what it would take to finance improvements, and the role government should play.
  • Collecting State & Local Data for Informed Social Policy Making

    Dennis Culhane, Professor at the School of Social Policy and Practice at the University of Pennsylvania, joins host Dan Loney to discuss his recent B-School Seminar presented to congressional staffers that focuses on helping staffers better understand how state and local evidence is gathered, which ultimately serves as a basis for forming federal social policy regulations. Dennis is also the Co-Principal Investigator for the Actionable Intelligence for Social Policy, and Director of Research, National Center for Homelessness Among Veterans.
  • Achieving Regulatory Excellence

    Much attention has been given to Donald Trump’s call for deregulation, a priority based on the notion that regulation impedes business growth. According to data from the Penn Wharton B-School for Public Policy seminar “Achieving Regulatory Excellence” by Professor Cary Coglianese, the number of cumulative pages in the code of Federal regulations has more than doubled from 75,000 to over 180,000 between 1975 and 2016. But regulatory excellence is more complicated than the raw number of regulations and needs to incorporate not only concern for the success of businesses, but also, and perhaps more importantly, the protection of citizens. Cary Coglianese, the Edward B. Shils Professor of Law and Political Science and Director of the Penn Program on Regulation has researched and written extensively on “Achieving Regulatory Excellence”. He joins Dan Loney, host of Knowledge@Wharton Radio to discuss the topic.
  • Regulating Robo-Advisors, Wharton Business Radio Interview

    With big data and automation becoming more common, so too has the “robo advisor”, any automated service that ranks or matches consumers to financial products on a personalized basis. Tom Baker, Professor of Law and Health Sciences at the University of Pennsylvania School of Law, joins host Dan Loney of Knowledge@Wharton to discuss his recent B-School for Public Policy seminar about research he’s been doing on the regulation of robo-advisors, particularly within the financial services industry.
  • Insuring High Risks Fairly, Protecting Individuals Against Flood Losses

    As Congress looks at restructuring the National Flood Insurance Program — legislators must address the issue of fairness. Howard Kunreuther, Professor of Decision Sciences and Business Economics and Public Policy at the Wharton School, joins host Dan Loney on Knowledge@Wharton to discuss this important and timely topic.
  • US Workforce Development and Employer Tax Incentive Plans

    There has been much talk recently about a skills gap in the United States. Even though unemployment is in the low 4% territory, there are still many jobs that companies seemingly can’t fill because the people applying for them may not have the skills necessary. But it raises an interesting question: Who is actually responsible for taking care of that gap? Peter Cappelli, Director of the Center for Human Resources and Professor of Management at the Wharton School and Host of In the Workplace, joins host Dan Loney on Knowledge@Wharton.