• <div class="header-image" style="background-image: url(/live/image/gid/4/2756_V6N7Web_Header_small.rev.1533574420.jpg);">​</div><div class="header-background-color"/>
B School for Public Policy Monthly 90-minute sessions on Capitol Hill »

Policy Issues

Tags

No Tags

Tags

No Tags
  • U.S. President Donald Trump asked securities regulators to explore replacing quarterly reporting requirements with half-ye... August 17 Trump asks SEC to study six-month corporate filings.

    With orders from President Trump, the SEC will begin a study on the effects of reducing the frequency of submitted financial reports; DC Court clears the way for Obama-era EPA chemical plant safety rule; Record low youth unemployment metrics suggest strong labor participation; Consumer sentiment was at 95.3 this month, the lowest levels since September 2017.

  • DC Events

    Assistant Professor Faculty Research Fellow, National Bureau of Economic Research Sep14  Universal Basic Income 1:00pm - 2:30pm
    Location: TBD
    The idea of a universal basic income (UBI) has generated a lot of conversation this year. The conversation in the U.S. often has focused on whether a UBI program here would be politically palatable and feasible. Its economic implications, however, are not always well understood. This seminar will draw on new research on UBI-style programs, such as the Alaska Permanent Fund, to discuss their effects, especially with regard to labor markets.
  • Penn Wharton PPI Faculty Affiliate, Professor Kevin Werbach August 16 How the Blockchain Can Transform Government

    In a discussion on blockchain, Faculty Affiliate Kevin Werbach debunks central assumptions of the technology and provides a series of examples of how its application in untraditional spaces such as supply chain operations can be revolutionary. 

  • Penn Wharton PPI Faculty Affiliate, Professor Joao F. Gomes August 16 Portugal’s Economic Recovery: How Much Came from Ditching Austerity?

    In a discussion on factors that led to Portugal’s economic recovery, Faculty Affiliate Joao Gomes expands the conversation to include what further must be done. In particular, Gomes focuses on productivity as a necessary precondition for future growth.

  • Issue Brief V6N7 August 6 The Missing Pieces of the Economic Debate Over Immigration Reform

    To the extent that immigration reform is discussed in terms of economics, the debate tends to focus exclusively on labor issues—specifically, how immigrants affect jobs and wages for native citizens. But to understand the economic effects of immigration, and thus develop sounder policies, policymakers need to consider how immigration affects all three core components of economic growth: not just labor, but capital and innovation too. In this brief, Professor Hernandez discusses new research showing that immigration produces gains for the U.S. economy with respect to capital and innovation. Immigrants help to attract investment from foreign firms and significantly increase bilateral trade flows between the U.S. and their home countries. Immigrants also account for roughly a quarter of all U.S. entrepreneurs. They not only generate novel businesses and inventions, but also introduce novel ideas that U.S. natives develop further to create new products and companies of their own. Just as importantly, labor, capital, and innovation are all interrelated. Failing to understand the multipli¬cative relationship between these three elements can result in botched economic policy.

  • New data providers continue to flood the emerging alternative data industry. According to AlternativeData.org, over 300 al... August 1 Big Data’s Big Role in Finance and Financial Regulation

    Picture this: you’re tired of the spam in your inbox, so you download a new app for your browser that blocks it. While downloading, the Terms of Agreement pop up, and you click ‘Agree’ – because why wouldn’t you? Unbeknownst to you, while you are now enjoying your spam-free email, the Slice Technologies app is analyzing your emails for purchase receipts and selling this anonymized data to hedge funds.[1] Is that an invasion of privacy? Not quite, as you agreed to the terms. But why would hedge funds, and other investment advisers, want this information? Well, with this kind of alternative data, investment firms can make much more accurate predictions about a company’s sales revenue and its health. This new world of alternative data poses incredible alpha-creating potential for investment advisers, as well as new legal concerns for the courts and regulators.